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The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity


from its origins to circa AD 700, across the entire Christian world


Four Greek monograms carved on a column, which may be understood as an invocation of *Mary (Mother of Christ, S00033) as the God-Bearer. Found near Chalkedon/Chalcedon (Bithynia, north-west Asia Minor). Probably 6th c. or later.

Evidence ID

E00958

Type of Evidence

Inscriptions - Inscribed architectural elements

Inscriptions - Formal inscriptions (stone, mosaic, etc.)

Hypothetical interpretation of four monograms carved on a column:

(Θεοτόκε, βοήθει τῷ δούλῳ σου
Ἰωσὴφ τῷ ἀθλίῳ)

'(God-Bearer, help your servant Ioseph, the miserable)!'

Text:
I. Kalchedon, no. 107.

Non Liturgical Activity

Prayer/supplication/invocation
Bequests, donations, gifts and offerings

Protagonists in Cult and Narratives

Other lay individuals/ people

Source

Four monograms inscribed on a column, found by Ioannes Miliopoulos before 1907 in the ruins to the east of Pendik (ancient Panteichion, area of Chalkedon / Chalcedon). Miliopoulos did not attempt to decipher them himself. A hypothetical interpretation was suggested to him by Henri Grégoire.

Discussion

The interpretation of the meaning of these monograms, suggested by Henri Grégoire is hypothetical, though not unjustified.

Dating: This kind of invocation with the 'servant-of-saint' formula is usually dated to the 6th/8th c. or later, and is indeed common in the middle Byzantine period.


Bibliography

Edition:
Die Inschriften von Kalchedon, no. 107.

Miliopoulos, I., "Βυζαντιακαὶ τοποθεσίαι",
Byzantinische Zeitschrift 16 (1907), 557.

Further reading:
Miliopoulos, I., "Βυζαντιναὶ τοποθεσίαι", Byzantinische Zeitschrift 29 (1929-1930), 245.


Record Created By

Pawel Nowakowski

Date Last Modified

11/06/2020

Related Saint Records
IDNameName in SourceIdentity
S00033Mary, Mother of ChristΘεοτόκοςCertain


Please quote this record referring to its author, database name, number, and, if possible, stable URL:
Pawel Nowakowski, Cult of Saints, E00958 - http://csla.history.ox.ac.uk/record.php?recid=E00958