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The Cult of Saints in Late Antiquity


from its origins to circa AD 700, across the entire Christian world


Name

Eulalia, virgin and martyr of Mérida

Saint ID

S00407

Number in BH

BHL 2699-2703

Reported Death Not Before

303

Reported Death Not After

312

Gender
Female
Type of Saint
Martyrs, Virgins
Related Evidence Records
IDTitle
E00367Gregory of Tours writes the Glory of the Martyrs (Liber in Gloria Martyrum), in Latin in Tours (north-west Gaul), 580/594. Overview entry.
E00640Gregory of Tours, in his Glory of the Martyrs (90), tells of trees miraculously blossoming in December, during her feast, at the tomb of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) in Mérida (south-west Spain), thereby predicting the abundance of the harvest for the next year. Written in Latin in Tours (north-west Gaul), 580/594.
E00787Prudentius writes Crowns of the Martyrs III, a poem on the martyrdom *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407): Eulalia, a twelve-year-old girl, willingly provokes her own martyrdom; at her death a dove leaves her mouth and snow covers her dead body. Written in Latin in Calahorra (northern Spain), c. 400. Overview of Peristephanon III.
E00788Prudentius, in his poem (Crowns of the Martyrs III) on *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407), describes the tomb and shrine of the saint in Mérida (south-west Spain) and the custom of bringing flowers to her tomb. Written in Latin in Calahorra (northern Spain), c. 400.
E00801Prudentius, in his poem (Crowns of the Martyrs IV) on the *Eighteen Martyrs of Saragossa (north-eastern Spain, S00485), lists the saintly patrons of various places in Spain, Gaul and North Africa, who will be presented by their cities at the Last Judgement, and singles out Saragossa for special praise, because of the number of its martyrs. Written in Latin in Calahorra (northern Spain), c. 400.
E02046According to Hydatius, in AD 429 the Suevic leader Heremigarius offended the martyr *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) while pillaging Lusitania (south-west Spain); consequently, his army was defeated, and Heremigarius himself drowned. Account in Hydatius' Chronicle, written in Latin, probably in Chaves (north-west Spain), c 468/469.
E02047Hydatius in his Latin Chronicle records how Theodoric II, king of the Goths, refrained from the pillage of Mérida (south-west Spain) in 456/7 because of warnings from *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407); written probably in Chaves (north-west Spain), c 468/469.
E03216The Lives of the Fathers of Mérida, written in Latin in 633/660, presumably in Mérida (south-west Spain), recounts how Agustus, a young boy serving the church of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) falls ill and during his illness has a vision of heaven and the saints. On the night following his death he is seen as a figure in white. He is buried in the basilica of *Eulalia.
E03292The Lives of the Fathers of Mérida written in Latin in 633/660, in Mérida (south-west Spain) recount the conflict in the city over the basilica and relics of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) between the Arian King Leovigild and his bishop Sunna, and Bishop Masona of Mérida in 569/586.
E03293The Lives of the Fathers of Mérida written in Latin in 633/660, in Mérida (south-west Spain), makes numerous references to the church in the city of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407).
E03498Augustine of Hippo preaches a sermon on the feast of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407), in which he also mentions other martyrs, all of them from Africa. Sermon 313G, delivered in Latin, probably in Hippo Regius (North Africa) in the early 410s.
E03509The Lives of the Fathers of Mérida written in Latin in 633/660, in Mérida (south-west Spain), tells the story of a woman, a debtor of Bishop Fidelis (c. 560-570). Fidelis, seriously ill, lies in the basilica of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) and remits debts, returning pledges. The woman, however, is unable to receive her remission because of the great crowd. At home, she has a vision of the martyrs *Cyprian (bishop and martyr of Carthage, S00411) and *Laurence, (deacon and martyr of Rome, S00037) who say that she failed because she never visited their basilicas.
E03536The Lives of the Fathers of Mérida written in Latin in 633/660, in Mérida (south-west Spain) recount that because of the virtues of Bishop Masona (c. 570–c. 600/610) and the merits of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407), God kept disease and famine far from Lusitania, people were wealthy, joyful, and full of charity, and the Jews and pagans converted to Christianity.
E03537The Lives of the Fathers of Mérida, written in Latin in 633/660 in Mérida (south-west Spain), tells how *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) appears in a vision to the exiled Bishop Masona and promises him he will be restored to his see. Later she appears to the Arian King Leovigild, flogs him and orders him to bring Masona back to Mérida. On his way back, Masona meets the servants of his church who had been forced by Masona's replacement Nepopis to load church property, considered to belong to Eulalia, onto wagons and to take it to Nepopis' home city.
E04190Prudentius writes Crowns of the Martyrs XI, a poem on the martyrdom of *Hippolytus (martyr of Rome, S00509); the poem is an account of the visit of Prudentius to the tomb of Hippolytus on the via Tiburtina (outside Rome), and contains an account of the saint's martyrdom in Ostia (the port of Rome). Written in Latin in Calahorra (northern Spain), c. 400. Overview of Peristephanon XI.
E04223Prudentius, in his poem (Crowns of the Martyrs XI) on *Hippolytus (martyr of Rome, S00509), tells of the feast of the saint in Rome on 13 August, and asks Bishop Valerianus of Calahorra, to whom this poem is dedicated, to introduce the feast on this day into Spain; he also mentions the feasts of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407), *Cyprian (bishop and martyr of Carthage, S00411), and *Chelidonius (soldier and martyr of Calahorra, companion of Emeterius, S00410). Written in Latin in Calahorra (northern Spain), c. 400.
E05172Latin Orationale of the Old Hispanic Liturgy of the 7th c. (Orationale Visigothicum), with prayers used on the feasts of saints in December: *Leocadia (virgin and confessor of Toledo, S01367), *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407), *Mary, Mother of Christ (S00033), *Stephen, the First Martyr (S00030), *Eugenia (virgin and martyr of Rome, S00401), *John the Apostle and Evangelist (S00042), *Columba (virgin and martyr of Sens, 01862).
E05515Hymn in honour of *Eulalia (virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407) composed in Latin in Spain possibly in the 7th c.
E05862The Calendar of Willibrord, in its earliest version, records the feasts of various saints in December. Written in Latin at Echternach, Frisia (north-east Gaul), 703/710.
E06245Venantius Fortunatus, in a poem on virginity (8.3), when describing the court of heaven lists numerous saints with the cities of their resting-place. Written in Latin in Gaul, probably in the early 570s.
E06516Aldhelm, in his prose On Virginity, addresses in his opening salutation ten nuns at the monastery at Barking (south-east Britain), four of whom are seemingly named after saints: *Justina/Ioustina (virgin and martyr of Antioch, S01704), *Scholastica (nun of central Italy, ob. c. 543, S01728), *Eulalia (probably the virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407; or perhaps the one of Barcelona, S02047), and *Thekla (follower of the Apostle Paul, S00092). Written in Latin in southern Britain, c. 675/686.
E06626Aldhelm, in his prose On Virginity, names *Thekla (follower of the Apostle Paul, S00092) and *Eulalia (probably the virgin and martyr of Mérida, S00407; or perhaps Eulalia of Barcelona, S02047) as exemplary virgins. Written in Latin in southern Britain, for the nuns at the monastery at Barking (south-east Britain), c. 675/686.
E06659Aldhelm's verse On Virginity lists a range of saints as exemplary virgins, with some variations to the list found in the earlier prose version of the same treatise. Written in Latin in southern Britain, for the nuns at the monastery at Barking (south-east Britain), c. 675/710. Overview entry